Gerry's Blog

Search

905-318-6677

Today, we have finally gotten some much-needed rain.

Last evening around 6 pm, we were at a picnic. Just as we started to eat, a few rain drops splattered here and there. "It can rain all it likes in a couple of hours," I thought. However, it held off for the benefit of the picnickers.

This morning early there were a few more drops, just enough to wet the ground everywhere, but after I got to the office, it rained fairly steadily all day (at least until mid-afternoon).

This slow steady rain will be much more useful than a quick thundershower that pours down buckets in a short time. Much of that kind of rain will not soak into the ground; much will end up running off into the storm sewers. An all-day rain will penetrate deeply.

Just in case the summer continues to be hot and dry, here are some watering guidelines for your lawn. On the other hand, if giving you these tips will help the rain to fall on a regular basis (once a week, preferably at night) then so much the better.

When watering your lawn, it's best to water at least one inch (2.5 cm) per week, preferably all at one time. Deep watering will encourage deep rooting, which will help the lawn in dry weather. Frequent shallow watering discourages deep roots.

Watering in the mornings before the sun gets too hot is more efficient than watering during the heat of the day when a lot of water will be lost to evaporation. If you are paying for your water, why waste it!

Too much water can lead to fungus disease problems. Excessive moisture encourages soft succulent leaf blades that are more susceptible to disease infection.

Mow your lawn high. Set the cutter blade so that it cuts the grass 3 inches (7.5 cm) high. The longer leaf blades will shade the soil and the roots, so less water is lost to evaporation. The cooler soil temperatures are also beneficial to the lawn.

Aerate your lawn each year (spring or fall) to improve water penetration. Apply a high-quality grass seed after the aeration to increase the lawn's density.

 

 

If you have a lawn/tree/shrub that needs some Tender Loving Care - get The KING OF GREEN:

 

 

 

or call us at 905.318.6677 or 1.888.TURFKING (887.3546)

 

If you would like more information, please Contact us

 

Follow us on Twitter  http://twitter.com/turfkingofgreen

 

Join our Facebook page  

 

Copyright 2007 Turf King-Hamilton. All Rights Reserved.

Several people have reported the Japanese adult beetles eating the leaves of their grape vines and other home landscape ornamentals. These beetles will feed on a wide range of ornamental plants. They skeletonize foliage, giving it the characteristic lacy look.

Adult beetles can fly. This mobility makes it harder to control them. There are several insecticides registered for the adults. Treatments may need to be repeated to ensure adequate coverage of the plants' foliage.

Japanese beetle traps are one way to eliminate the adults. Rittenhouse says their trap uses sex pheromones to attract the male beetle, but they suggest not using the trap if you don't have a problem. 


Upper Canada and Natural Insect Control have a tr
ap that uses a floral attractant as well as a pheromone that lures both sexes.

 

We can also use an organic foliar feed/spray containing Neem. Neem oil does not directly kill the beetles but disrupts their feeding and reproduction.

 


Also, the Japanese beetle larvae are the White grubs that can wreak havoc on a lawn. I would recommend considering a Merit application to control the larvae.
Nematodes are also a consideration to control white grubs.

 

 

If you have a lawn/tree/shrub that needs some Tender Loving Care - get The KING OF GREEN:

 

 

 

or call us at 905.318.6677 or 1.888.TURFKING (887.3546)

 

If you would like more information, please Contact us

 

Follow us on Twitter  http://twitter.com/turfkingofgreen

 

Join our Facebook page  

 

Copyright 2007 Turf King-Hamilton. All Rights Reserved.

Wild Parsnips

A few weeks ago a colleague sent me a new item about a municipality that had a concern about wild parsnips. They can be as bad as poison ivy. Never heard of that before, so I better find out.

"Fine", I said, "but what do they look like?" So you do a Google image search for "Wild Parsnip." Fine, yellow flowers and all. Then did a Google search for "Wild Parsnip." At the top of the list was an article entitled Burned by wild parsnip. These particular weeds can cause "phyto-photo-dermatitis" to those who come in contact with the leaves or stems.

These chemicals in the plants can cause an inflammation of the skin when these areas are exposed to sunlight.

"Learned something new today", I said.

Then a week or two later, we were walking through the fields behind a friend's property when I saw these yellow flowers. "Hey, they look like the wild parsnips." I told Tim, I would check it out and let him know. But to be sure I took a picture for comparison. Sure enough, they were wild parsnips. I sent Tim the information in an email.

Then a few days later, I saw a huge patch of wild parsnips near the York bridge and as I drove down the road today, I could see more patches here and there. There are a number of other roadside plants with yellow flowers blooming right now, but the flower head is quite unique. Seems to grow in the areas that the county does not mow because of the roadslide slope or because of a hydro pole.

So if you are out and about in the countryside, please keep a watch out for this dangerous weed.

 

 

If you have a lawn/tree/shrub that needs some Tender Loving Care- get The KING OF GREEN:

 

 

 

or call us at 905.318.6677 or 1.888.TURFKING (887.3546)

 

If you would like more information, please Contact us

 

Follow us on Twitter  http://twitter.com/turfkingofgreen

 

Join our Facebook page  

 

Copyright 2007 Turf King-Hamilton. All Rights Reserved.

A good lawn care program can give you a better looking lawn when a lot of other lawns are still rubbing their eyes after the long winter nap.

This is a lawn that was fertilized late October last year. Notice how much greener it is than the neighbouring lawns at the beginning of April after a long hard winter.

Winter Fertilizer Advantage in Lawn Care in Binbrook Ontario

With Turf King's slow release fortified organic fertilizer, the lawn can absorb nutrients during the cooler months in the fall even when it looks like there is little activity. Those important nutrients are stored in the roots and are ready for action early in the spring. 

On lawns with a late season fertilizer application, warmer weather in the spring lets those lawns start the green-up process much sooner than lawns that are not as nutritionally stable.

Call Turf King to book your lawn care program and make sure to include the winter fertilizer in your lawn package. Professional lawn care packages from the lawn care experts serving Binbrook, Burlington, Hamilton, Ancaster Dundas and Oaville

 

 

Here's our Facebook Page

Help! Grubs!

See the lawn library. Click here.

Turf King

Lawn care makes a difference. Click here.

Free Estimate

Request a quote. Click here.

Anniversary Savings

See our video for savings! Click here.

Login Form